Pure (Project Urban Renewable Energy)

building collaborative

What We Do

The Mission

The Mission of PURE is to build resilient, socially sustainable communities one block at a time. The outcome is a Smart City where every stakeholder is “smarter” because they were included in the process.

SMART CITIES AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

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  • Energy is crucial for achieving almost all of the Sustainable Development Goals, from its role in the eradication of poverty through advancements in health, education, water supply and industrialization, to combating climate change.

In this video William Houser Sr. Project Manager at Georgia Power Company, Russell R. McMurry, P.E. Commissioner, Georgia Department of Transportation, Rhonda Briggins-Ridley, Senior Director, External Affairs Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority [MARTA],  Lee Beckmann, Manager Governmental Affairs, Georgia Port Authority, Douglas R. Hooker – Executive Director of the Atlanta Regional Commission (ARC) and Djuan Coleon CEO of PURE  discuss energy efficiency, reducing our carbon footprint and innovative ways their organizations are working together to build sustainable systems while at the same time reducing environmental impacts.

“Pathway to Sustainable Cities: Innovation in Energy and Environmental Stewardship “

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Sustainable Development Goal 9: Infrastructure, Industrialization and Innovation in Georgia. In the video below Rhonda Briggins-Ridley, Senior Director, External Affairs Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority [MARTA], Lee Beckmann, Manager Governmental Affairs, Georgia Port Authority, Douglas R. Hooker – Executive Director of the Atlanta Regional Commission (ARC) and Djuan Coleon CEO of PURE discuss how their organizations are working together to build resilient, sustainable infrastructure solutions in the region.

“Infrastructure, Industrialization and Innovation in Georgia “

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By 2030, provide access to safe, affordable, accessible and sustainable transport systems for all, improving road safety, notably by expanding public transport, with special attention to the needs of those in vulnerable situations, women, children, persons with disabilities and older persons.

In the first video in the Sustainable Development series, Rhonda Briggins-Ridley, Senior Director, External Affairs
Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority [MARTA] talks about how MARTA hopes to expand the transit system to include smart transport options in order to help reach sustainable development goals for the city of Atlanta.

This is panel discussion on “Building Sustainable Development” was held during Rainbow PUSH’s 17th Annual Creating Opportunity Conference is “Converting Opportunity to Wealth In Our Community”.

“Smart Cities: Building Sustainable Transport Systems”

Part 2 features Douglas R. Hooker – Executive Director of the Atlanta Regional Commission (ARC), Russell R. McMurry, P.E. Commissioner, Georgia Department of Transportation and Djuan Coleon CEO, PURE discuss how local and state agencies are working together to build sustainable transport in the region.

Part 3 features William Houser, Sr. Project Manager at Georgia Power Company talks about how they’re transitioning from fossil fuels to electric transportation systems to help reach Sustainable Development Goals in Georgia. Lee Beckmann, Manager Governmental Affairs, Georgia Port Authority discusses the Mid American Arc Rail project and how it will help increase capacity and access reducing environmental impact to the community.

 

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THE PURE RECYCLING REMIX CHALLENGE

In an effort to encourage recycling on  HBCU campuses, student organizations were challenged by PURE to Remix a Recycle Bin to be used on campus for recycling. 

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Circle K international

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SOCIAL MEDIA

 

ecologicaljustice     economicjustice

environmental     socialjustice

Please Watch to Learn How to #ActOnClimate

Pure Blog

Smart Cities and Sustainable Transport: Will Everyone Be Able To Ride?

Sustainable Development Goal number 11 has a target that by 2030, "provide access to safe, affordable, accessible and sustainable transport systems for all, improving road safety, notably by expanding public transport, with special attention to the needs of those in vulnerable situations, women, children, persons with disabilities and older persons." Is it harder for marginalized populations to "catch a ride" in Smart Cites? Smart City Transport, what are the options? Well we have smart street car projects in cities like Atlanta.  In Austin, Texas there are plans for connected automated cars, smart stations and mobility marketplaces. Columbus, Ohio is focused on

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Smart Cities: Solar Power and Lead Poisoning

How do we reconcile the virtues of Smart Cities and renewable energy sources such as solar power juxtaposed with lead poisoning in our cities? Solar power is set to grow by 94% in 2016. In the first quarter solar accounted for 64% of new electric capacity additions enough to power 5.7 million homes. Yet at the other end of the spectrum we are seeing lead poisoning proliferate in low income communities of Cleveland, Chicago, and of course Flint.   How does Solar power and lead poisoning fit within the framework of the United Nations 17 Sustainable Development goals?  United Nations

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Smart Cities: Connected Things and Disconnected Citizens

Forecasters predict there will be over 1.7 Billion connected things in use in our cities by 2018. The Internet of Things (IoT) allows everything from LED street lighting to your refrigerator to communicate and share data. In a move to be more efficient and leverage data municipalities are aggressively planning how to be more connected. The issue is what happens when the humans that are supposed to be benefiting by this technological advancement are left out of the information loop, disengaged and disconnected? HIGH CONNECTIVITY AND LOW ENGAGEMENT  The United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 11 is to make cities inclusive,

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WILL SMART CITIES BE EQUITABLE CITIES? by Djuan Coleon CEO, PURE

 

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In 2015 the United Nations held the Sustainable Development Summit with world leaders who adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. A set of 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) were adopted to end poverty, fight inequality and injustice, and tackle climate change by 2030. The SDG’s help frame the world’s cities goals to build Smart Cities and provide greater connectivity via The Internet of Things (IoT). What cannot get lost in society is still wrestling archaic constructs of race and class. How do we build Smart Cities juxtaposed with systemic issues of police brutality, environmental and social justice?  

The United Nations has adopted 17 Sustainable Development Goals and I believe goal number 16 “Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions” is paramount in building sustainability in communities and cities.

“Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels” (Global Goals Peace and Justice

Building “Smart Cities” is not just about upgrading the infrastructure, adding green spaces and increasing transportation options. Citizens of every demographic have to feel included in the process as well as included in society. Right now we have such a divide in America when it comes to law enforcement and how policing is done in black, white and brown communities.

African-Americans make up only 13 percent of the population, yet they are the victims in 26 percent of all police shootings. That is nearly 3 times the rate of whites.” ( Matt Agorist “The Free Thought Project” )

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We just can’t be concerned about improving transportation options for citizens but we also have to improve police and community relations so there is equity.

The U.S. Department of Transportation issued a “Smart City Challenge” to integrate and connect technology – self-driving cars, connected vehicles, and smart sensors – into their transportation network. Yet there seems to be this obliviousness to the challenge that low income and disadvantaged communities don’t have adequate access to regular bus and rail service. 

“WITHOUT REALLY GOOD PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION, IT’S VERY DIFFICULT TO DEAL WITH INEQUALITY,” KANTER SAID. ACCESS TO JUST ABOUT EVERYTHING ASSOCIATED WITH UPWARD MOBILITY AND ECONOMIC PROGRESS—JOBS, QUALITY FOOD, AND GOODS (AT REASONABLE PRICES), HEALTHCARE, AND SCHOOLING— RELIES ON THE ABILITY TO GET AROUND IN AN EFFICIENT WAY, AND FOR AN AFFORDABLE PRICE.” ( ROSABETH MOSS KANTER THE ATLANTIC ). 

Smart city innovations are great but will there be equity innovation? One of the new trends in city is Bike sharing programs but studies have shown over the 800 plus programs across America. The majority of the users of the bike sharing program are white and half of these users have incomes over $100,00 a year.

“Bike share is still very much the domain of white upper-class males,” said transportation researcher Elliot Fishman, who contributed to 2014 findings that revealed members of bike-share programs skew male, wealthy, educated, and Caucasian. ( Take Part )

In June of 2016 Atlanta just started a bike sharing program and the costs start at $8 an Hour or $15 a month for an hour use per day. ( Atlanta Bike Sharing Program )

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The Department of Transportation recently awarded Columbus, Ohio $40 Million dollars to come up with creative ways to integrate new technologies into the city’s infrastructure. One innovation was creating “neighborhood hubs” where people can connect via smart phones and get real time information on bus routes and bike sharing availability. I always go back to equity in sustainable development. Low income and minority communities struggle to get access to bike sharing programs and expanded transportation options. As cities like Atlanta are rolling out Google Fiber networks, some residents don’t have access to the internet or have very slow connection speeds.

“More than 13 percent of low-income areas in the United States don’t have access to broadband, compared to fewer than 3 percent of the wealthiest areas” (center for public integrity)

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 One of the main objectives of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals is that “no one is left behind”. I would surmise that whole segments of society will be left behind if we don’t factor equity into the equation for “Smart Cities” and sustainable development. 

UPCOMING EVENTS

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RECENT EVENTS

How Does The #BlackLivesMatter Movement intersect with Environmental Justice at SXSW ECO

Environmental Justice: Killing Us Softly at National Action Network National Conference

National CARES Mentoring Movement STEMFest

White House HBCU Week Conference STEM

 

Board

Djuan Coleon
Executive Director
Kimberly Corbin
Board Member
Kimberly King
Board Member

About The Board

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